You are here

Long-Term Diversity and Genome Adaptation of Acinetobacter baylyi in a Minimal-Medium Chemostat

TitleLong-Term Diversity and Genome Adaptation of Acinetobacter baylyi in a Minimal-Medium Chemostat
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsJezequel, N, Cosentino Lagomarsino, M, Heslot, F, Thomen, P
JournalGenome Biology and Evolution
Volume5
Pagination87-97
Abstract

Laboratory-based evolution experiments on microorganisms that do not recombine frequently show two distinct phases: an initial rapid increase in fitness followed by a slower regime. To explore the population structure and the evolutionary tree in the later stages of adaptation, we evolved a very large population (∼3 × 10) of Acinetobacter baylyi bacteria for approximately 2,800 generations from a single clone. The population was maintained in a chemostat at a high dilution rate. Nitrate in limiting amount and as the sole nitrogen source was used as a selection pressure. Analysis via resequencing of genomes extracted from populations at different generations provides evidence that long-term diversity can be established in the chemostat in a very simple medium. To find out which biological parameters were targeted by adaptation, we measured the maximum growth rate, the nitrate uptake, and the resistance to starvation. Overall, we find that maximum growth rate could be a reasonably good proxy for fitness. The late slow adaptation is compatible with selection coefficients spanning a typical range of 10–10 per generation as estimated by resequencing, pointing to a possible subpopulations structuring.

URLhttp://gbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/5/1/87.abstract
DOI10.1093/gbe/evs120