The Laboratory of Computational and Quantitative Biology (LCQB), headed by A. Carbone, is an interdisciplinary laboratory working at the interface between biology and quantitative sciences. It is built to promote a balanced interaction of theoretical and experimental approaches in biology and to foster the definition of new experimental questions, data analysis and modeling of biological phenomena. Our projects address questions on biological structures and processes through the gathering of experimental measures, the in silico generation of new biological data that remain inaccessible to experiments today (modeling of biological systems), the development of statistical methods for data analysis, and the conception of original algorithms aimed to predictions. The lab is supported by the CNRS and the University "Sorbonne Université".


March 19, 2018

Several members of LCQB co-authored « Meet-U: educating through research immersion », which appeared in PLOS Computational Biology on 03/15/2018. Meet-U is a new educational initiative that aims to train students for collaborative work in computational biology and to bridge the gap between education and research. Meet-U mimics the setup of collaborative research projects and takes advantage of the most popular tools for collaborative work and of cloud computing. Students are grouped in teams of 4–5 people and have to realize a project from A to Z that answers a challenging question in biology. In this paper, we report on our experience with Meet-U in two French universities with master’s students in bioinformatics and modeling, and with protein–protein docking as the subject of the course.


To the Article

March 19, 2018

In the framework of their cooperation, IFOM (Milan) and CQB (Paris) have set up a scientific rotation program specifically targeted to PhD students.
Students can spend three months in a host group on a scientific topic, with the goal of exploring new approaches and contexts,and acquiring new skills.

Here you can find general rules and how to apply.
Here you can find a list of currently posted projects ( you can also apply spontaneously outside of posted projects).


March 6, 2018

"A protein coevolution method uncovers critical features of the Hepatitis C Virus fusion mechanism" appeared in PLoS Pathogens, from A.Carbone team. This work sheds light on important structural features of the HCV fusion mechanism and contributes to advance our functional understanding of this process. This study also provides an important proof of concept that coevolution can be employed to explore viral protein mediated-processes, and can guide the development of innovative translational strategies against challenging human-tropic viruses.

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January 10, 2018

Elodie Laine of the Analytical Genomics team co-organized the Meet-U colloquium on the 10th of January 2018: Meet-U aims at bridging the gap between teaching and research in computational and quantitative biology. It brings together Sorbonne Université, Univ. Paris-Sud and Univ. Paris-Diderot.
The theme of this year was protein-protein docking: »

December 18-19, 2017

 Marco Cosentino Lagomarsino of the GenomicPhysics team organizes the conference Quantitative Methods in Gene Regulation IV ( here you may find the poster image).

December 13, 2017

Alessandra Carbone and Elodie Laine are organizing the "UPMC Young Researchers' Meeting: Modeling Complex Biological Systems"

The talks on current work in computational biology at UPMC will be given by PhD students and Postdocs working at UPMC labs. It will be an opportunity to listen at ongoing research and learn what is done in close by departments.

The up to date program is available here

October 12, 2017

F.Nadalin and A.Carbone published CIPS, a new computational method for scoring protein docking decoys based on a combination of residue-residue contact preferences and interface compositional bias. CIPS outperforms state-of-the-art methods on screening protein-protein docking models and improves the ranking on 28 CAPRI targets. The drastic reduction of candidate solutions produced by thousands of proteins docked against each other makes large-scale docking accessible to analysis.

To the Software
To the Article

September 13, 2017

We highlight our new database Plasmobase to the community working in malaria with a new blog appeared in

June 28, 2017

Eleonora De Lazzari* published her findings on scaling laws for gene families. A striking quantitative invariant in evolutionary genomics is the scaling with genome size of the number of proteins sharing a specific function. E.D.L. showed that such scaling laws exist systematically at the level of single evolutionary families. This provides a novel view of the links between evolutionary expansion of protein families and gene functions.This work was performed in collaboration with J Grilli (U. Chicago) and S Maslov (U. Illinois).

June 14, 2017

Angela Falciatore, head of the Diatom Genomics team, shared her thoughts for Beyond the Lab, the magazine of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

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